FUCK ABLEISM!
Image from the Spanish film “Acción Mutante”

FUCK ABLEISM!

Image from the Spanish film “Acción Mutante”

I tried to change my password to “vagina” but they said it was too easy.

The other day I went to a “Restorative Yoga class”, don’t get me wrong…I know is a myth that people  with Fibromyalgia do yoga…Hahaha, It is impossible to do about 95% of  it, well at least for me. But I was in pretty bad shape, and was going  to the pool in the gym to do some gentle exercises in the water (the  only thing I  do), but it was closed. So I saw a lady with white hair  getting ready for a yoga class and I asked if it was difficult and she  said it wasn’t. I went to the studio afraid, and walked in to the room, and  saw that there where only old women with white hair, and I was like :  “Yay!!!” this is the class for me. I won’t get pushed around here, I  thought…I usually feel relieved  if I see old people, because I feel  like and old lady, like I am 100 years old. I did the class, and of  course, I am still somewhat naive and thought I could do what old women  with white hair that walk very slowly, and get offered seats in the bus  can do. Well, Suprise, surprise!!!! Of course I couldn’t! My Pain  Pshycologist reminded me “These women do not have fibromyalgia”..I  couldn’t even lift my arms, and every little or soft movement gave me  excruciating pain. So I told my Therapist, I just wish so much, that I  looked like them and people will treat me with more kindness and will  offer me a seat in the bus!!!  And that I wouldn’t get jerks laughing at me, when I ask for a seat reserved for people with disabilities (I gave up doing this, to much emotional distress, I just fall in the floor). I just wish I could press a magic button,  and have an automatic disguise when I go in to public transport, to get  groceries, etc.. of an elder lady, so I get treated according how I feel  and according to my disability, not based on my looks.

The other day I went to a “Restorative Yoga class”, don’t get me wrong…I know is a myth that people with Fibromyalgia do yoga…Hahaha, It is impossible to do about 95% of it, well at least for me. But I was in pretty bad shape, and was going to the pool in the gym to do some gentle exercises in the water (the only thing I  do), but it was closed. So I saw a lady with white hair getting ready for a yoga class and I asked if it was difficult and she said it wasn’t. I went to the studio afraid, and walked in to the room, and saw that there where only old women with white hair, and I was like : “Yay!!!” this is the class for me. I won’t get pushed around here, I thought…I usually feel relieved  if I see old people, because I feel like and old lady, like I am 100 years old. I did the class, and of course, I am still somewhat naive and thought I could do what old women with white hair that walk very slowly, and get offered seats in the bus can do. Well, Suprise, surprise!!!! Of course I couldn’t! My Pain Pshycologist reminded me “These women do not have fibromyalgia”..I couldn’t even lift my arms, and every little or soft movement gave me excruciating pain. So I told my Therapist, I just wish so much, that I looked like them and people will treat me with more kindness and will offer me a seat in the bus!!!  And that I wouldn’t get jerks laughing at me, when I ask for a seat reserved for people with disabilities (I gave up doing this, to much emotional distress, I just fall in the floor). I just wish I could press a magic button, and have an automatic disguise when I go in to public transport, to get groceries, etc.. of an elder lady, so I get treated according how I feel and according to my disability, not based on my looks.

asker

missvegan-deactivated20120118 asked: Oh god that would have made me sob!

Is nice to see that there are other young Vegan women with Fibromyalgia to support each other!

asker

heathersday asked: It's nice to know when you're not alone.

I hope this is a medium, where we can build bonds of support and strength to overcome the day to day obstacles we face!

asker

prettyontheinside420 asked: Thank you for following me...I really like your Tumblr and it's comforting to know that there are other people on here with fibro. I hope your struggle with all the pain get's better...it really sucks =/

I am new to this(Tumblr), and  I am so glad I found a community of young women with Firbomyalgia. I just hope is a space where we can express what we are embarrassed or afraid to tell people…and when we feel we are about to explode, because everyone treats us without the kindness we deserve, because of our invisible disability and good looks! ;-)

The Little Mermaid" (Danish: Den lille havfrue) is a fairy tale by the Danish poet and author Hans Christian Andersen about a young mermaid  with Fibromyalgia!
"The Sea Witch warns, however, that once she becomes a human, she will never be able to return to the sea. Drinking the potion will make her feel as if a sword is being passed through her, yet when she recovers she will have two beautiful legs… However, it will constantly feel like she is walking on sharp swords, and her feet will bleed most terribly. ”

The Little Mermaid" (DanishDen lille havfrue) is a fairy tale by the Danish poet and author Hans Christian Andersen about a young mermaid  with Fibromyalgia!

"The Sea Witch warns, however, that once she becomes a human, she will never be able to return to the sea. Drinking the potion will make her feel as if a sword is being passed through her, yet when she recovers she will have two beautiful legs… However, it will constantly feel like she is walking on sharp swords, and her feet will bleed most terribly. ”

(via svshvsioux)

Think about the people that love you, and that will carry you and support you, through the times when you suffer the worst pain and fatigue. Coping, is surviving!

Think about the people that love you, and that will carry you and support you, through the times when you suffer the worst pain and fatigue. Coping, is surviving!

Killing Me Softly : FM/CFS & Suicide

I started reading about the relationship of Fibromyalgia and suicide after I read about Fabian, a 28 year old boy from Spain that wrote on his  suicide note: “I haven’t committed suicide, I died from Fibromyalgia”. He left a warning to the world, showing how serious chronic pain is. Fabian also said: “…I say goodbye looking at a picture of Ché (Guevara) that I have in front of my bed and remembering one of his most famous phrases: I rather die, that live forever kneeling…”

(Video of Fabian’s letter in Spanish  here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JsiTcFSF3Js)

Killing Me Softly : FM/CFS & Suicide

Editor’s Note: Lisa Lorden Myers, a CFS/fibromyalgia patient from California, is a well-known writer. For three years, she was the Guide to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia at About.com. This article was originally published in Fibromyalgia Frontiers, the journal of the National Fibromyalgia Partnership.By Lisa Lorden Myers

On August 15, 1996, Dr. Jack Kevorkian reportedly assisted in the suicide of Judith Curren, 42, of Pembroke, Massachusetts. She suffered from chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia (FM). Jan Murphy, another FM sufferer, also turned to Kevorkian for help; ABCNews.com later reported her assisted suicide in the summer of 1997.

A recently publicized investigation in the UK revealed that just last year, Julia Revill, age 58, hanged herself outside her family home after becoming frustrated at a lack of medical help for her Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME). ME is the name used abroad for chronic fatigue syndrome. She had shown some improvement after treatment at the UK’s only ME hospital in Essex but had been refused funding by the local health authority for further treatment there, and her condition deteriorated.

The loss of “one of our own” always hits hard. These and other reports sent shock waves through the FM/CFS community. Patients with fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome have an exquisite understanding of the pain, both physical pain and emotional anguish, associated with having a poorly understood, incurable disease. “When you start hearing there is no hope, no treatment, and no cure over and over, you lose your will to fight,” wrote Jan Murphy in a eulogy read at her funeral. “What most people saw of me was a shell of what was going on inside.”

The FM/CFS community is certainly not alone in addressing the problem of suicide. Each year, nearly 30,000 people in the United States take their own lives. It is the 11th leading cause of death in our country and accounts for more than 10% of all deaths in the US.

Suicide and FM/CFS

It is unclear whether there is an increased risk of suicide among FM/CFS patients, as compared to the general population. No specific data exist about the number of FM/CFS-related suicides. However, there is evidence that chronic pain and illness put patients at risk for suicide. According to the CFIDS Association of America, experts studying 80 suicide cases in the state of Washington suggested that physical illness, including cancer, heart disease and arthritis, contributed to half of those suicides. An illness like fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome, which is often doubted or neglected by the medical community, the public, and sometimes family and friends, can present unique problems. Patients with FM/CFS can become victims of isolation and despair.

Secondary depression is a well-known symptom of FM/CFS and is common with any type of chronic pain. Sufferers depend on a variety of sources of support, including pain management, psychological support, and financial support. When one of these essential needs remains unmet over a long period of time, it is possible for patients to begin to believe that their situation is hopeless.

In fact, a recent report published by Action for ME, a UK non-profit organization, revealed that 51% of survey respondents have felt suicidal as a result of their illness. Those with the most severe cases of the illness and who received delayed diagnosis and management were most likely to have considered suicide.

Responding to Suicidal Thoughts

Martha Ainsworth, founder and director of Metanoia, a non-profit organization dedicated to suicide prevention, describes the problem of suicide succinctly. She writes, “Suicide happens when pain exceeds resources for coping with pain.” There are many kinds of pain that may lead to suicide, and individuals vary greatly in their capacity to withstand pain. According to Ainsworth, you can survive suicidal feelings if you do either of two things: (1) find a way to reduce your pain, or (2) find a way to increase your coping resources. Both are possible.

It is important to realize that suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem. The Journal of the American Medical Association has reported that 95% of all suicides occur at the peak of a depressive episode. For many people who feel suicidal, there seems to be no other way out. But suicidal thoughts are typically a reflection of distorted thinking caused by severe depression or even by the neurological changes associated with FM/CFS itself. When we are depressed, we tend to see things through the very narrow perspective of the present moment. A week or a month later, things may look completely different.

Warning Signs of Suicide

  • Talking or joking about suicide or statements about being reunited with a deceased loved one
  • Making statements about hopelessness, helplessness, or worthlessness (“Life is useless” or “Everyone would be better off without me.”)
  • Preoccupation with death (recurrent death themes in music, literature, or drawings)
  • Appearing suddenly happier or calmer
  • Loss of interest in things one cares about
  • Unusual visiting or calling people one cares about (saying good-byes)
  • Giving possessions away, making arrangements, or settling one’s affairs
  • Self-destructive or risk-taking behavior (alcohol/drug abuse, reckless driving, self-injury or mutilation).

Most people who once thought about killing themselves are now glad to be alive. They say they didn’t want to end their lives - they just wanted to stop the pain. According to Dr. William Collinge, Ph.D., author of several books including Recovering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, “If you can remind yourself that the suicidal thoughts or feelings are transitory and symptomatic of the illness, this will help you get through those times when you are in the bottom of the pits and can’t see any way out. Also, talking about your feelings with a confidant or loved one can help immeasurably.”

Experts agree that talking about suicidal feelings is one of the most important things you can do. Talking to a caring and supportive friend or family member can be helpful, and there are a variety of helplines and support groups to whom people who are feeling suicidal can reach out. Severe depression, the primary cause of suicide, is highly treatable. If depression is recognized and treated, many suicides can be prevented.

Anyone who has suffered with fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome knows that it requires a huge adjustment, not only to the illness itself but to all the consequences it has on our lives. Chronic illness is likely to affect the way sufferers live, the way they see themselves, and how they relate to others. With the present state of world events, many people are feeling additional tension, anxiety, or sadness. But suffering with severe depression may be unnecessary. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, it’s essential that you know you don’t have to go it alone. Suicide is preventable, and there are a variety of resources that can provide the support you need.

http://www.cfidsselfhelp.org/library/killing-me-softly-fmcfs-suicide

A familiar feeling….I feel there is something really wrong growing inside my body. Foreign organisms that cause torturous pain invading my muscles. Sometimes they are capsules of poison that burst inside, sometimes they are giant steel balls that start spinning around inside my body, tearing up my muscles and other times, they are bombs that explode in millions of tiny little pieces and the pieces cut up my flesh. When I thought about Nina, plucking out her feathers out..I thought, it is a familiar feeling…

BUT YOU DON’T LOOK SICK!
FUCK YOU!
That is why is a fucking invisible disability, you selfish ableist!
"You Look Good"=fuck you very much, that is my top priority in life, after I  stop feeling I am going to die from pain!
image:http://kittyslittertray.blogspot.com/?zx=fea15a852122328b

BUT YOU DON’T LOOK SICK!

FUCK YOU!

That is why is a fucking invisible disability, you selfish ableist!

"You Look Good"=fuck you very much, that is my top priority in life, after I  stop feeling I am going to die from pain!

image:http://kittyslittertray.blogspot.com/?zx=fea15a852122328b

Fibro-Fog

Symptoms of Fibro-fog

The severity of Fibro-fog fluctuates from day to day, as well as from person to person. The following is a list of possible signs and symptoms:

* Mental confusion and fatigue
* Loss of short-term memory
* Inability to concentrate
* Impaired thinking
* Absentmindedness
* Inability to recognize familiar surroundings
* Disorientation
* Inability to comprehend written or spoken words
* Trouble with directions
* Short attention span (seems like ADHD; sometimes speaking over others)
* Acquired dyslexia (includes difficulty speaking known words)

http://www.zimbio.com/Fibromyalgia/articles/210/Explaining+Chronic+Illness+Others

Fibrocool

Controversial Irish Singer Sinead O’Connor joins the short list of celebrities revealing how fibromyalgia has impacted her career. In 2003, O’Connor revealed in an interview with Dublin’s Hot Press magazine that fibromyalgia was a key factor in her announcing her retirement from music. The singer admitted to having a high pain threshold; she just couldn’t handle the fatigue that came with it.


 http://www.thirdage.com/fibromyalgia/celebrities-with-fibromyalgia/sinead-oconnor#ixzz19C9WKuOR

rubixcubegirl:

I’m in the mood for spreading the word about Fibromyalgia! Although ignore ‘joints’ :-/

rubixcubegirl:

I’m in the mood for spreading the word about Fibromyalgia! Although ignore ‘joints’ :-/

Little monsters that munch on my muscles every night…

Little monsters that munch on my muscles every night…